Sleep Support

Sleep Support

We’re all too familiar with starting the day after a restless night with a cup of coffee, but just how bad is insomnia for your health?

A Japanese study conducted on non-diabetic workers aged 35–55 with no family history of diabetes, showed that poor sleep was associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes. Of the participants who had less than five hours sleep, 3.5% more developed diabetes compared with those who had more than seven hours of sleep.

Sleep is a component of the body’s allostatic load (this refers to the body’s ability to achieve stability through change, to recuperate and restore itself). When this form of balance is disturbed, it may result in the body being unable to deactivate or activate the stress response appropriately, or even recognise that a response is required. Women struggling with fibromyalgia experienced more fatigue, worse mood and delayed recovery after inadequate sleep.

Insomnia can further damage quality of life by escalating inflammation, which in turn increases the risk for cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, mental disorders, as well as an increased absence from work and subsequent medical costs.

If your sleep patterns are impacting your performance, it’s possible to catch up the sleep you lost. However, more than one recovery night is needed. A recent study suggests that eight hours of recovery sleep is insufficient, but when extended to 10 hours, white blood cell count improves and alertness is restored.  However, multiple nights of recovery sleep are required when sleep deprivation is chronic. A 30-minute lie-down prior to the recovery sleep resulted in additional recovery.

So, sufficient sleep, both in quantity and quality, is essential for proper functioning.


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PLEASE NOTE: Products are ranked in decreasing order of potency. Products listed nearer the top of any particular health need are the most effective and have the most scientific research to support their use in respect of such health need. Multiple products, one from each bullet (•) can be combined with products from other bullets for added effectiveness, if needed, since products from different bulleted lines have different mechanisms of action. However, where more than one product is listed within a particular bullet (•), then only one of these products should be used, since all products listed within the same bullet share an identical or similar pharmacology (mechanism of action) for that condition. This is because whenever a particular condition is treated via multiple different mechanisms of action, the result is generally improved effectiveness. However, when products are combined that work via exactly the same mechanism of action, then no extra benefit is obtained.

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